Lis Neubeck

Lis Neubeck

Prof Lis Neubeck PhD, BA (Hons), RN, NFESC

Professor

Biography

Lis Neubeck is Professor and Head of Theme of the Long Term Conditions theme in the School of Health and Social Care at Edinburgh Napier University. She is an Honorary Professor of Sydney Nursing School, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney. She is an Adjunct Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences at Flinders University in Adelaide. Lis has recently completed a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Early Career Fellowship, and is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the George Institute for Global Health. Her research focuses on innovative solutions to secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, identification and management of atrial fibrillation, and use of new technologies to improve access to health care. Lis has secured over £1.5m in competitive research funding and has won notable prizes and awards for her research, including the prestigious Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Nursing Prize (2013). She has supervised to completion 2 Honours students; both achieved First Class Honours; and 1 PhD student; and she has 4 current PhD students, 1 MPhil student and 2 Honours students. Lis is President of the Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association (2015-2017), served on the board of the Cardiovascular Nursing Council of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (2013-2016), and is the Australian representative on the Global Alliance for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease of the World Heart Federation. She served on the Faculty of the eCardiology and eHealth Conference in Berlin (October 2016). She has is on the programme committee of the Cardiovascular Council of Nurses and Allied Professionals of the European Society of Cardiology. She is also a Fellow of the European Society of Cardiology.

Themes

Research Areas

Current Post Grad projects

Non-Napier PhD supervisions

  • Self-efficacy and physical activity among people with coronary heart disease and/or diabetes mellitus who are commencing a weight management program