Research Output

Plotting affect and premises for use in aesthetic interaction design: towards evaluation of the everyday.

  This short paper presents an experimental approach to the difficulty of evaluating interactive systems as artefacts for everyday life. The problem arises from the event-like nature of the user-centred evaluation session, as distinct from ‘being’ or the ‘ongoing flow’ of daily life, and from the dynamic complexity of the lifeworlds of users in human centred design approaches. In analysing the data from a recent project investigating the aesthetic and utilitarian figurations of a wireless system of computational jewellery, it was found that the participants made references to a range of notional lifeworlds, and that the premises for use attached to these varied in type. An overview of the evaluation procedure, including pre and post task sessions with the user group, is given, and the results from the project discussed.

  • Date:

    11 September 2006

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • DOI:

    10.1007/978-1-84628-664-3

  • Library of Congress:

    QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    004 Data processing & computer science

Citation

Kettley, S. & Smyth, M. (2006). Plotting affect and premises for use in aesthetic interaction design: towards evaluation of the everyday. doi:10.1007/978-1-84628-664-3. ISBN 978-1-84628-588-2

Authors

Keywords

user experience; lifeworlds; premises for use; designing for the everyday; meaning making; evaluation; wearable computing; computational jewellery;

Available Documents