Research Output

Posttraumatic symptomatology and dissociation in outpatients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

  A number of studies have concluded that dissociative features are
common in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The
present study aimed to investigate correlates of dissociation in
outpatients with chronic PTSD in Scotland. For the purposes of this
study, a total of 102 participants completed the Dissociative
Experiences Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, and
the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. Information regarding
trauma characteristics (i.e., type and presence of physical injury)
was also collected. Regression analysis revealed that increased
severity and frequency of posttraumatic symptoms, as measured by
the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale total, was the only significant
predictor of dissociation. In line with previous research, our
findings indicate that chronic PTSD symptoms could be contributing
to the maintenance of clinical dissociation and vice versa in this sample of Scottish outpatients.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    30 November 2009

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Routledge, Taylor and Francis

  • DOI:

    10.1080/15299730903143667

  • ISSN:

    1529-9732

  • Library of Congress:

    RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    616 Diseases

Citation

Karatzias, T., Power, K., Brown, K. & McGoldrick, T. (2009). Posttraumatic symptomatology and dissociation in outpatients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Trauma and Dissociation. 11, 83-92. doi:10.1080/15299730903143667. ISSN 1529-9732

Authors

Keywords

posttraumatic stress disorder; predictors; dissociation;

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