Research Output

Test-retest reliability, validity and sensitivity to change of the urogenital distress inventory and the incontinence impact questionnaire.

  Aims.
To evaluate two quality of life measures for urinary incontinence (UI) in Scottish females.

Methods.
Three groups with UI from two regions in Scotland were studied. Two groups were receiving treatment for incontinence; the third was not. Women completed the UDI and IIQ twice to allow assessment of test-retest reliability and validity. Treatment groups completed the questionnaires again, postintervention, to assess ability of the measures to detect change. Other measures used to assess validity were the SF-36, HADS, weight of urine leaked, and number of incontinence episodes. By design, the three subject groups differed significantly in their characteristics, ensuring a diverse sample of women.

Results.
Analysis of reliability showed a clinically trivial but statistically significant decrease in total UDI (mean, -6.1; 95% CI, -11.0 to -1.5) and IIQ (mean, -9.7; 95% CI, -15.5 to -3.9) scores between test and retest assessments, possibly due to a research effect. Most items of the UDI (18 of 19) and IIQ (28 of 30) performed very well on test-retest. The UDI and IIQ were valid in that higher scores (indicating more bothersomeness of symptoms/impact on daily living) were associated with greater severity of UI. Additionally the IIQ showed the expected associations with measures of anxiety and health status.

Conclusions.
Both the UDI and IIQ detected changes in women's conditions due to intervention. The measures had good psychometric properties, including test-retest reliability, across subject groups.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    10 October 2002

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Wiley Interscience

  • DOI:

    10.1002/nau.10075

  • ISSN:

    0733-2467

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    610 Medicine & health

Citation

Hagen, S., Hanley, J. & Capewell, A. (2002). Test-retest reliability, validity and sensitivity to change of the urogenital distress inventory and the incontinence impact questionnaire. Neurourology and Urodynamics. 21, 534-539. doi:10.1002/nau.10075. ISSN 0733-2467

Authors

Keywords

Urinary incontinence; Quality of life; Outcome measurement; Psychometric testing

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