Research Output

The effects of refuse-feeding on home-range use, group size, and intergroup encounters in the banded mongoose.

  The effects of food availability and distribution on population dynamics have been the subject of numerous experimental studies, but no study has quantified the effects of a concentrated supplementary food supply on groups of a social carnivore. We investigated the effects of refuse-feeding at garbage dumps on banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) groups. Garbage dumps represent a reliable, concentrated source of food. Data were collected from three refuse and seven nonrefuse-feeding groups in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. Groups were located using radiotelemetry, and home-range size and use, group size and population density, and intergroup encounter rate were analysed. Although refuse-feeding groups had home ranges similar in size to those of nonrefuse-feeding groups, their home-range use was more concentrated and their core areas always included the available predictable garbage dumps. Two of the three refuse-feeding groups were larger and denser than other groups. The two groups that shared the same garbage dump had significantly higher intergroup encounter rates than all other groups and their encounters occurred at the shared dump.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    01 January 2002

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    NRC Research Press

  • DOI:

    10.1139/z02-113

  • ISSN:

    0008-4301

  • Library of Congress:

    QL Zoology

Citation

Gilchrist, J. & Otali, E. (2002). The effects of refuse-feeding on home-range use, group size, and intergroup encounters in the banded mongoose. Canadian Journal of Zoology. 80, 1795-1802. doi:10.1139/z02-113. ISSN 0008-4301

Authors

Keywords

Banded Mongoose; Mungos Mungo; Refuse feeding; Rubbish dumps; Concentrated food source; Home range sizes; Movement patterns; Intergroup encounters; Uganda;

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