Brian Williams

Brian Williams

Dr Brian Williams

Professor

Biography

I have over 25 years research experience and 12 years’ experience of leading two different joint university multidisciplinary research units: 5 years as Associate Director and 7 as Director. I do not consider myself a typical academic. Although I maintain an international profile for my personal research in behavioural science and research methods my key focus and national & international reputation is on development of research expertise at the individual, group and organizational level – especially in the area of nurses, midwives and allied health professionals (see below). This includes levering and facilitating national policy, and working across HEIs; both Units I have directed have been joint enterprises between two universities.

2005-2010 Associate Director and then Director of the Social Dimensions of Health Institute (Universities of Dundee & St Andrews) expanded from 2 FTE academic staff to a total of 25 researchers including two professors, a reader and a number of research fellows and research assistants.

2011-2016 Director of the Chief Scientist Office, Midwifery & Allied Health Professions Research Unit (NMAHP RU –Universities of Stirling & Glasgow Caledonian) - this more than doubled in size to over 60 people over a four year period, and an 8-10 fold increase in funding across our two sites (current annual spend £2.75m per annum), and with grant success rates of approximately 50%. The Unit also tripled its staff contribution to REF from 2008 to 2015.

2014-2016 Dean of Research Enhancement University of Stirling. This is a university wide role with a remit to develop the research income of the university and develop capacity and capability across all Schools in the University.

Esteem

Grant Funding Panel Member

  • Health Research Board for Ireland- young investigator fellowship panel
  • Health Research Board for Ireland - Chair of national funding review group for national PhD programme
  • Health Research Board for Ireland - SPHERE National PhD programme Review Panel Member
  • Norwegian Research Council- HSR panel
  • Chief Scientist Office HSR Fellowship Panel
  • Chief Scientist Office HSR Fundng Panel

 

Date


110 results

Podiatry intervention versus usual care to prevent falls in care homes: pilot randomised controlled trial (the PIRFECT study)

Journal Article
Wylie, G., Menz, H. B., McFarlane, S., Ogston, S., Sullivan, F., Williams, B., …Morris, J. (2017)
Podiatry intervention versus usual care to prevent falls in care homes: pilot randomised controlled trial (the PIRFECT study). BMC Geriatrics, 17(1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0541-1
Background Common foot problems are independent risk factors for falls in older people. There is evidence that podiatry can prevent falls in community-dwelling populations. Th...

‘Doing the right thing’: factors influencing GP prescribing of antidepressants and prescribed doses

Journal Article
Johnson, C. F., Williams, B., MacGillivray, S. A., Dougall, N. J., & Maxwell, M. (2017)
‘Doing the right thing’: factors influencing GP prescribing of antidepressants and prescribed doses. BMC family practice, 18(1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12875-017-0643-z
Background: Antidepressant prescribing continues to increase, with 5-16% of adults receiving antidepressants annually. Total prescribing growth is due in part to increased lon...

Modifying Alcohol Consumption to Reduce Obesity (MACRO): development and feasibility trial of a complex community-based intervention for men

Journal Article
Crombie, I. K., Cunningham, K. B., Irvine, L., Williams, B., Sniehotta, F. F., Norrie, J., …Slane, P. W. (2017)
Modifying Alcohol Consumption to Reduce Obesity (MACRO): development and feasibility trial of a complex community-based intervention for men. Health Technology Assessment, 21(19), 1-150. https://doi.org/10.3310/hta21190
Background Obese men who consume alcohol are at a greatly increased risk of liver disease; those who drink > 14 units of alcohol per week have a 19-fold increased risk of dyin...

Achieving Good Outcomes for Asthma Living (GOAL): Mixed methods feasibility and pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of a practical intervention for eliciting, setting and achieving goals for adults with asthma

Journal Article
Hoskins, G., Williams, B., Abhyankar, P., Donnan, P., Duncan, E., Pinnock, H., …Sheikh, A. (2016)
Achieving Good Outcomes for Asthma Living (GOAL): Mixed methods feasibility and pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of a practical intervention for eliciting, setting and achieving goals for adults with asthma. Trials, 17(1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-016-1684-7
Background Despite being a core component of self-management, goal setting is rarely used in routine care. We piloted a primary care, nurse-led intervention called Achieving G...

Reducing patient delay in Acute Coronary Syndrome (RAPiD): research protocol for a web-based randomized controlled trial examining the effect of a behaviour change intervention

Journal Article
Farquharson, B., Johnston, M., Smith, K., Williams, B., Treweek, S., Dombrowski, S. U., …Grindle, M. (2017)
Reducing patient delay in Acute Coronary Syndrome (RAPiD): research protocol for a web-based randomized controlled trial examining the effect of a behaviour change intervention. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73(5), 1220-1234. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.13191
Aims To evaluate the efficacy of a behaviour change technique-based intervention and compare two possible modes of delivery (text+visual and text-only) with usual care. Backgr...

Interventions for sustained healthcare professional behaviour change: a protocol for an overview of reviews

Journal Article
Dombrowski, S. U., Campbell, P., Frost, H., Pollock, A., McLellan, J., MacGillivray, S., …Williams, B. (2016)
Interventions for sustained healthcare professional behaviour change: a protocol for an overview of reviews. Systematic Reviews, 5(1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-016-0355-9
Background Failure to successfully implement and sustain change over the long term continues to be a major problem in health and social care. Translating evidence into routine...

Optimising the validity and completion of adherence diaries: A multiple case study and randomised crossover trial

Journal Article
Frost, R., McClurg, D., Brady, M., & Williams, B. (2016)
Optimising the validity and completion of adherence diaries: A multiple case study and randomised crossover trial. Trials, 17, https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-016-1615-7
BACKGROUND: Diaries are the most commonly used adherence measurement method in home-based rehabilitation trials, yet their completion and validity varies widely between trials...

Form of delivery as a key ‘active ingredient’ in behaviour change interventions

Journal Article
Dombrowski, S. U., O'Carroll, R. E., & Williams, B. (2016)
Form of delivery as a key ‘active ingredient’ in behaviour change interventions. British Journal of Health Psychology, 21(4), 733-740. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12203
First paragraph:The form of delivery (FoD) is a vital part of any behaviour change intervention and not merely a by-product of operationalising theory and behaviour change tec...

What Adherence Measures Should Be Used in Trials of Home-Based Rehabilitation Interventions? A Systematic Review of the Validity, Reliability, and Acceptability of Measures

Journal Article
Frost, R., Levati, S., McClurg, D., Brady, M., & Williams, B. (2017)
What Adherence Measures Should Be Used in Trials of Home-Based Rehabilitation Interventions? A Systematic Review of the Validity, Reliability, and Acceptability of Measures. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 98(6), 1241-1256.e45
Objective To systematically review methods for measuring adherence used in home-based rehabilitation trials and to evaluate their validity, reliability, and acceptability. Dat...

A theory-informed approach to developing visually mediated interventions to change behaviour using an asthma and physical activity intervention exemplar

Journal Article
Murray, J., Williams, B., Hoskins, G., Skar, S., McGhee, J., Treweek, S., …Gauld, D. (2016)
A theory-informed approach to developing visually mediated interventions to change behaviour using an asthma and physical activity intervention exemplar. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 2, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-016-0091-x
Background Visualisation techniques are used in a range of healthcare interventions. However, these frequently lack a coherent rationale or clear theoretical basis. This lack...

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