Research Output

Current perspectives on the transmission of Q fever: Highlighting the need for a systematic molecular approach for a neglected disease in Africa.

  Q fever is a bacterial worldwide zoonosis (except New Zealand) caused by the Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii). The bacterium has a large host range including arthropods, wildlife and companion animals and is frequently identified in human and livestock populations. In humans, the disease can occur as either a clinically acute or chronic aetiology, affecting mainly the lungs and liver in the acute disease, and heart valves when chronic. In livestock, Q fever is mainly asymptomatic; however, the infection can cause abortion, and the organism is shed in large quantities, where it can infect other livestock and humans. The presence of Q fever in Africa has been known for over 60 years, however while our knowledge of the transmission routes and risk of disease have been well established in many parts of the world, there is a significant paucity of knowledge across the African continent, where it remains a neglected zoonosis. Our limited knowledge of the disease across the African sub-continent have relied largely upon observational (sero) prevalence studies with limited focus on the molecular epidemiology of the disease. This review highlights the need for systematic studies to understand the routes of C. burnetii infection, and understand the disease burden and risk factors for clinical Q fever in both humans and livestock. With such knowledge gaps filled, the African continent could stand a better chance of eradicating Q fever through formulation and implementation of effective public health interventions.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    01 March 2019

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Elsevier BV

  • DOI:

    10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.02.032

  • Cross Ref:

    S0001706X19300889

  • ISSN:

    0001-706X

  • Library of Congress:

    RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    616 Diseases

  • Funders:

    Edinburgh Napier Funded

Citation

Salifu, S. P., Bukari, A. A., Frangoulidis, D., & Wheelhouse, N. (2019). Current perspectives on the transmission of Q fever: Highlighting the need for a systematic molecular approach for a neglected disease in Africa. Acta tropica, 193, 99-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.02.032

Authors

Keywords

Parasitology; Infectious Diseases; General Medicine, Coxiella burnetti; Q fever; Zoonosis; Livestock; Africa;

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