Research explorer tool

35 results

Introduction: ‘Tenshillingland’: Community and Commerce, Myth and Madness in the Modern Scottish Novel

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2016)
Introduction: ‘Tenshillingland’: Community and Commerce, Myth and Madness in the Modern Scottish Novel. In S. Lyall (Ed.), Community in Modern Scottish Literature, 1-24. Brill Academic Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004317451_002
While ‘community’ as a concept has come under increasing attack in a neoliberal era, it has remained in Scotland a mythic, though not unexamined, signifier of resistance to pe...

Hugh MacDiarmid's poetry and politics of place: imagining a Scottish republic.

Book
Lyall, S. (2005)
Hugh MacDiarmid's poetry and politics of place: imagining a Scottish republic. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
By examining at length for the first time those places in Scotland that inspired MacDiarmid to produce his best poetry, Scott Lyall shows how the poet’s politics evolved from ...

‘East is West and West is East’: Lewis Grassic Gibbon's Quest for Ultimate Cosmopolitanism

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2011)
‘East is West and West is East’: Lewis Grassic Gibbon's Quest for Ultimate Cosmopolitanism. In M. Gardiner, G. Macdonald, & N. O'Gallagher (Eds.), Scottish Literature and Postcolonial LiteratureComparative Texts and Critical Perspectives, (136-146). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. https://doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748637744.003.0010
This chapter addresses Lewis Grassic Gibbon's quest to shatter the colonial conception of East and West and return to an age of cosmopolitanism. His idealistic model of a cosm...

J. Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon and exploration

Journal Article
Lyall, S. (2012)
J. Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon and exploration. Scottish literary journal. Supplement, 4, 131
The article presents the literary works of James Leslie Mitchell using the pseudonym Lewis Grassic Gibbon. It discusses Mitchell's adventurous spirit as reflected in the trave...

Hugh MacDiarmid’s Impossible Community.

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2016)
Hugh MacDiarmid’s Impossible Community. In S. Lyall (Ed.), Community in Modern Scottish Literature, 82-102. Brill Academic Publishers
This chapter suggests two main related points. The overarching contention is that Hugh MacDiarmid was a poetic, political, polemical, and metaphysical impossibilist (rather th...

Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Renaissance.

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2012)
Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Renaissance. In G. Carruthers, & L. McIlvanney (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Scottish LiteratureCambridge: Cambridge University Press
Though commonly viewed as definitively rural and nationalist, the Scottish Literary Renaissance was actually begun in London by an émigré community of Burnsian Scots. The Vern...

'Hauntings of Celticism': Fionn Mac Colla and the Myth of History

Journal Article
Lyall, S. (2014)
'Hauntings of Celticism': Fionn Mac Colla and the Myth of History. Literature and History, 23(2), 51-66. https://doi.org/10.7227/LH.23.2.4
Fionn Mac Colla’s ideas of history can be characterised as postcolonial in their critique of historical determinism, Cartesian dualism and Whig progressivism. He utilises his ...

In search of community.

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2016)
In search of community. In S. Lyall (Ed.), Community in Modern Scottish LIterature, vii-xiii. Brill Academic Publishers
Community derives from the Latin root word communis (common), which itself breaks down into two possible derivations [...]. The first, com plus munis (what is indebted, bound,...

Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Literary Revival

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (in press)
Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Literary Revival. In The Blackwell Companion to Scottish LiteratureBlackwell
This chapter will examine the so-called revival of Scottish literature in the period from the First World War to the beginning of the Second World War. One main focus will be ...

Scotland’s Top Ten & the Inadequacy of a National Canon: Alasdair Gray’s Lanark (1981)

Journal Article
Lyall, S. (2017)
Scotland’s Top Ten & the Inadequacy of a National Canon: Alasdair Gray’s Lanark (1981). Studies in Scottish literature, 43(2),
Discusses the healthy overlap in the recent BBC Scotland poll on Scotland's Favourite Novel between popular appeal and critical recognition; judges Gray's Lanark as "Scotland'...

Date