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‘East is West and West is East’: Lewis Grassic Gibbon's Quest for Ultimate Cosmopolitanism

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2011)
‘East is West and West is East’: Lewis Grassic Gibbon's Quest for Ultimate Cosmopolitanism. In M. Gardiner, G. Macdonald, & N. O'Gallagher (Eds.), Scottish Literature and Postcolonial LiteratureComparative Texts and Critical Perspectives, (136-146). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. https://doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748637744.003.0010
This chapter addresses Lewis Grassic Gibbon's quest to shatter the colonial conception of East and West and return to an age of cosmopolitanism. His idealistic model of a cosm...

Scotland’s Top Ten & the Inadequacy of a National Canon: Alasdair Gray’s Lanark (1981)

Journal Article
Lyall, S. (2017)
Scotland’s Top Ten & the Inadequacy of a National Canon: Alasdair Gray’s Lanark (1981). Studies in Scottish literature, 43(2),
Discusses the healthy overlap in the recent BBC Scotland poll on Scotland's Favourite Novel between popular appeal and critical recognition; judges Gray's Lanark as "Scotland'...

Translating Modernism: The Scottish Renaissance Movement and German-language Modernism

Presentation / Conference
Lyall, S. (2013, December)
Translating Modernism: The Scottish Renaissance Movement and German-language Modernism. Paper presented at World-literatures, Discrepant Transnationalisms: Beyond Region and Nation?, Stuttgart, Germany
The Scottish Renaissance Movement of the 1920-30s was a response to what many literary artists of the period saw as Scotland’s provincialisation within the United Kingdom and ...

"Fiery Speech": Vision and Violence in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats and Patrick Pearse

Presentation / Conference
Lyall, S. (2016, August)
"Fiery Speech": Vision and Violence in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats and Patrick Pearse. Paper presented at ESSE 2016
This paper examines the work of two of the main protagonists behind the cultural and political revival of Ireland in the early twentieth century, W. B. Yeats and Patrick Pears...

Seeking God by strange ways: Symbolism and the Irish Revival

Presentation / Conference
Lyall, S. (2017, December)
Seeking God by strange ways: Symbolism and the Irish Revival. Paper presented at EUROPEAN REVIVALS CONFERENCE V – CULTURAL MYTHOLOGIES AROUND 1900, Edinburgh, Scotland
This paper will argue that the Irish Revival of the late nineteenth, early twentieth century was first-and-foremost a Symbolist movement. Focusing on the writing, thought and ...

Introduction: ‘Tenshillingland’: Community and Commerce, Myth and Madness in the Modern Scottish Novel

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2016)
Introduction: ‘Tenshillingland’: Community and Commerce, Myth and Madness in the Modern Scottish Novel. In S. Lyall (Ed.), Community in Modern Scottish Literature, 1-24. Brill Academic Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004317451_002
While ‘community’ as a concept has come under increasing attack in a neoliberal era, it has remained in Scotland a mythic, though not unexamined, signifier of resistance to pe...

J. Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon and exploration

Journal Article
Lyall, S. (2012)
J. Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon and exploration. Scottish literary journal. Supplement, 4, 131
The article presents the literary works of James Leslie Mitchell using the pseudonym Lewis Grassic Gibbon. It discusses Mitchell's adventurous spirit as reflected in the trave...

Hugh MacDiarmid’s Impossible Community.

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2016)
Hugh MacDiarmid’s Impossible Community. In S. Lyall (Ed.), Community in Modern Scottish Literature, 82-102. Brill Academic Publishers
This chapter suggests two main related points. The overarching contention is that Hugh MacDiarmid was a poetic, political, polemical, and metaphysical impossibilist (rather th...

Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Renaissance.

Book Chapter
Lyall, S. (2012)
Hugh MacDiarmid and the Scottish Renaissance. In G. Carruthers, & L. McIlvanney (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Scottish LiteratureCambridge: Cambridge University Press
Though commonly viewed as definitively rural and nationalist, the Scottish Literary Renaissance was actually begun in London by an émigré community of Burnsian Scots. The Vern...

'Hauntings of Celticism': Fionn Mac Colla and the Myth of History

Journal Article
Lyall, S. (2014)
'Hauntings of Celticism': Fionn Mac Colla and the Myth of History. Literature and History, 23(2), 51-66. https://doi.org/10.7227/LH.23.2.4
Fionn Mac Colla’s ideas of history can be characterised as postcolonial in their critique of historical determinism, Cartesian dualism and Whig progressivism. He utilises his ...

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