Research explorer tool

10 results

Clinical judgement in violence risk assessment

Journal Article
Murray, J., & Thomson, M. E. (2010)
Clinical judgement in violence risk assessment. Europe's journal of psychology, 6(1), 128-149. https://doi.org/10.5964/ejop.v6i1.175
The present article discusses the three main approaches to violence risk assessment, clinical judgement, actuarial assessment, and structured clinical judgement, informing the...

Male Youth Perceptions of Violent Extremism: towards a Test of Rational Choice Theory

Journal Article
Dhami, M. K., & Murray, J. (2017)
Male Youth Perceptions of Violent Extremism: towards a Test of Rational Choice Theory. The Spanish journal of psychology, 19(E51), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2016.49
Understanding how people perceive the pros and cons of risky behaviors such as terrorism or violent extremism represents a first step in developing research testing rational c...

Applying decision making theory to clinical judgements in violence risk assessment

Journal Article
Murray, J., & Thomson, M. E. (2010)
Applying decision making theory to clinical judgements in violence risk assessment. Europe's journal of psychology, 6(2), 150-171. https://doi.org/10.5964/ejop.v6i2.189
A considerable proportion of research in the field of violence risk assessment has focused on the accuracy of clinical judgements of offender dangerousness. This has largely b...

Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality.

Journal Article
Murray, J., Thomson, M. E., Cooke, D. J., & Charles, K. E. (2011)
Influencing expert judgment: attributions of crime causality. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 16, 126-143. https://doi.org/10.1348/135532510X490183
Purpose: The present research aimed to investigate the effects of attribution on expert clinical judgment in comparison to semi-experts and lay-people. Two research questions...

An Application of Attribution Theory to Clinical Judgment

Journal Article
Murray, J., & Thomson, M. E. (2008)
An Application of Attribution Theory to Clinical Judgment. Europe's journal of psychology, 5(3), (96-104). doi:10.5964/ejop.v5i3.257. ISSN 1841-0413
The current article presents an application of attribution theory to clinical judgment, with a focus on the theory’s application to clinical judgments of violence risk assessm...

Investigating the Influence of Causal Attributions on Both the Worksheet and Checklist Versions of the HCR-20

Journal Article
Murray, J., Charles, K. E., Cooke, D. J., & Thomson, M. E. (2014)
Investigating the Influence of Causal Attributions on Both the Worksheet and Checklist Versions of the HCR-20. International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 13(1), 8-17. https://doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2014.890978
Attribution theories suggest that when assessing an individual's actions, judgments are made about the cause of these behaviours and often these judgments focus on internal or...

Heuristics: The good, the bad, and the biased. What value can bias have for decision makers?

Journal Article
Curley, L. J., Murray, J. & MacLean, R. (2017)
Heuristics: The good, the bad, and the biased. What value can bias have for decision makers?. the Quarterly. , 41-44. ISSN 1746-6016
This discussion paper will look at heuristics (rule of thumb techniques for decision making), (Tversky & Kahneman, 1974) and their potential value. Typically, heuristics have ...

The relationship between the Big 5 personality traits and eyewitness recognition

Journal Article
Curley, L., MacLean, R., & Murray, J. (2017)
The relationship between the Big 5 personality traits and eyewitness recognition. Journal of Articles in Support of the Null Hypothesis, 13(2), (57-72
The aim of the current research was to identify which, if any, personality traits are related to recognition in an eyewitness task. A correlational design was used with the c...

Is the definition of task-irrelevant contextual information black and white?

Journal Article
Curley, L. J., Munro, J., Lages, M., MacLean, R., & Murray, J. (2020)
Is the definition of task-irrelevant contextual information black and white?. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 65(2), 668-670. https://doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.14273
Author's response to "Commentary on: Curley LJ, Munro J, Lages M, MacLean R, Murray J. Assessing cognitive bias in forensic decisions: a review and outlook. J Forensic Sci doi...

The influence of internal versus external attributions of crime causality: A comparison between experts, semi-experts and lay-people.

Conference Proceeding
Murray, J. & Thomson, M. E. (2009)
The influence of internal versus external attributions of crime causality: A comparison between experts, semi-experts and lay-people
The overarching aim of the present research was to investigate the possible effects of attribution on the decisions made by clinicians in comparison to those made by trainee p...