Research Output

A necessary evil? the use of interventions to prevent nasogastric tube-tugging after stroke.

  This study explores the perspectives of patients, relatives and carers on the use of interventions to prevent nasogastric tube-tugging following a stroke. The study was qualitative and involved focus groups with practitioners (n=3) and interviews with stroke patients (n=4) and relatives (n=4). Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach to identify key categories. The authors found that practitioners, patients and relatives viewed the use of interventions (e.g. hand mittens) to maintain nasogastric tube feeding in terms of benefits, harms and justice. The core category, linking all data, was ‘a necessary evil’, i.e. while interventions were undesirable their use as a final resort might be justified to maintain patients’ nutritional status post-stroke.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    30 April 2008

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    M A Healthcare Ltd.

  • ISSN:

    1747-0307

  • Library of Congress:

    RT Nursing

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    610.73 Nursing

Citation

Horsburgh, D., Rowat, A. M., Mahoney, C. M. & Dennis, M. S. (2008). A necessary evil? the use of interventions to prevent nasogastric tube-tugging after stroke. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing. 4, 230-234. ISSN 1747-0307

Authors

Keywords

Naso-gastric tube-tugging; stroke; patients; carers; interventions;

Available Documents