Research Output

Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: A qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services Abbreviated Title Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities

  Background: Globally diabetes is increasing with concerns about the impact on outcomes, including premature death and the costs associated with managing the condition. Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are 2-3 times more likely to develop diabetes; however there has been limited focus on diabetes service utilisation in this population. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of diabetes and ID practitioners.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    28 February 2017

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • DOI:

    10.1111/jir.12369

  • ISSN:

    0964-2633

  • Library of Congress:

    RC Internal medicine

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    616 Diseases

  • Funders:

    Diabetes UK

Citation

Brown, M., Taggart, L., Karatzias, T., Truesdale, M., Walley, R., Northway, R., …Davies, M. (2017). Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: A qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services Abbreviated Title Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. doi:10.1111/jir.12369. ISSN 0964-2633

Authors

Copyright

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Brown, M., Taggart, L., Karatzias, T., Truesdale, M., Walley, R., Northway, R., Macrae, S., Carey, M., and Davies, M. (2017) Improving diabetes care for people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and intellectual disability services. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, doi: 10.1111/jir.12369., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12369. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Keywords

diabetes; intellectual disability; learning disability; practitioner experiences; qualitative research; service provision

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