Research Output

A Randomised Controlled Trial to Assess the Effectiveness of Using Patient Reported Needs and Psychological Information to Guide Care in a Breast Cancer Follow-up Clinic.

  Approximately 550,000–570,000 women are alive in the UK who have had a diagnosis of breast cancer with predictions that this will rise by 3% annually. Most receive follow-up care in a hospital setting and the value of this approach has been questioned for a number of years. There is evidence that the current out-patient provision does not meet the physical, psychological and information needs of women with breast cancer, with women leaving the clinic with unmet needs. This study examined the effectiveness of providing patient-reported needs and psychosocial information to the Nurse at the follow-up clinic in reducing cancer needs and improving quality of life compared to standard care. The primary outcome was change in needs scored at baseline (time 1) and 12 months (time 2). The secondary outcomes were changes in quality of life at baseline and 12 months and the effects of the intervention on variables such as age, severity of treatment and time since diagnosis.



Method: A prospective single blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) was used. 93 women with breast cancer attending follow-up were randomised to standard follow-up care (control) or a nurse-delivered intervention. This intervention was structured and guided by the self-reported needs and psychosocial information provided by the woman and coupled with a person-centred conversation.



Results: No differences were seen between the groups in relation to the primary outcome; changes in needs. Quality of life scores fell in both groups and these showed a statistically significant difference between groups in relation to the secondary outcome, changes in quality of life over time.

Conclusion: The intervention was as effective as standard care in reducing cancer needs, anxiety and depression, and improving quality of life. Regression analysis revealed that having anxiety and depression are independently associated with unmet needs, and a number of quality of life variables.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    30 November 2014

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • ISSN:

    0162-220X

  • Library of Congress:

    RT Nursing

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    610.73 Nursing

Citation

Cruickshank, S., Barber, M., Donaldson, J. H., Raeside, R. & Gray, M. (2014). A Randomised Controlled Trial to Assess the Effectiveness of Using Patient Reported Needs and Psychological Information to Guide Care in a Breast Cancer Follow-up Clinic. Cancer Nursing. 38, S1-S106. ISSN 0162-220X

Authors

Keywords

Breast cancer; patient-reported needs; breast cancer care; follow-up clinics;

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