Research Output

Quantifying two-dimensional dichromatic patterns using a photographic technique: case study on the shore crab (Carcinus maenas L.)

  Contrasting patterns of pigmentation, such as those associated with crypsis and aposematism, are common in many taxa. In order to determine why patterning varies among individuals or populations, it is important to quantify how these patches of pigment are arranged. Here we present a simple technique for measuring areas of pigmentation as well as their spatial distribution, and demonstrate its application to the study of substrate-associated patterning in shore crabs (Carcinus maenas L.). The results, based on a virtual grid laid over digital images of crab carapaces, allow for correlations to be made among sample populations. The technique, or variations of it, can be applied to any situation where two-dimensional dichromatic patterns need to be quantified.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    18 February 2005

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Springer Science + Business Media

  • DOI:

    10.1007/s11284-004-0034-5

  • Cross Ref:

    34

  • Library of Congress:

    QH301 Biology

  • Dewey Decimal Classification:

    577 Ecology

Citation

Todd, P. A., Ladle, R. J., Briers, R. A., & Brunton, A. (2005). Quantifying two-dimensional dichromatic patterns using a photographic technique: case study on the shore crab (Carcinus maenas L.). Ecological research, 20(4), 497-501. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11284-004-0034-5

Authors

Keywords

Ecology, evolution, behavior and systematics,

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