Research Output

Road Users’ Behavior at Marked Crosswalks on Channelized Right-Turn Lanes at Intersections in the State of Qatar

  At non-signalized marked crosswalks, pedestrian priority is neither well-defined nor well acknowledged by drivers. This paper presents the findings of an investigation on both driver and pedestrian behavior at non-signalized marked crosswalks located on channelized right-turn lanes at intersections in the State of Qatar. Five crosswalks in Doha city were video recorded from discrete locations on a typical working day. The results from the data analysis of 1620 pedestrians’ behavior indicated that waiting behavior, gap acceptance, and crossing speed are complex phenomena and depend upon both pedestrians’ characteristics as well as their crossing characteristics. The drivers’ yielding behavior was mainly linked to pedestrians’ gender and adjacent land use. Low driver yielding rates indicated that significant improvements are required to enhance pedestrian safety. Among pedestrian attributes, gender had the most significant effect on crossing behavior followed by distractions, crossing in a group or alone, and dressing style. Findings of this research will be useful for planners when designing crosswalks at new intersections and during simulations of pedestrian and driver behavior at marked crosswalks on exclusive right-turn lanes. The results of this study will also be directly applicable to the Arabian Gulf countries as they exhibit similar conditions as the State of Qatar.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    15 October 2019

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    MDPI AG

  • DOI:

    10.3390/su11205699

  • Cross Ref:

    su11205699

  • Funders:

    Qatar National Research Fund

Citation

Muley, D., Kharbeche, M., Downey, L., Saleh, W., & Al-Salem, M. (2019). Road Users’ Behavior at Marked Crosswalks on Channelized Right-Turn Lanes at Intersections in the State of Qatar. Sustainability, 11(20), https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205699

Authors

Keywords

pedestrian safety; crossing behavior; yielding behavior; power paradox; gap acceptance; waiting behavior; crossing speed

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