Research Output

The implications of Ogilvie's syndrome for midwives and gastrointestinal nurses

  Ogilvie's syndrome is is an acute intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with massive dilatation, usually of the colon, but also of the small intestine. Mechanical obstruction is absent, and there is parasympathetic nerve dysfunction. Ogilvie's syndrome affects mainly the caecum and right colon, and can lead to life-threatening spontaneous perforation. The syndrome is attributed to imbalance of the autonomic nervous system, but the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown. This article gives an overview of the normal anatomy and physiology of the large bowel, and examines the aetiology, diagnosis and management of Ogilvie's syndrome. The role of the nurse and midwife in the recognition and management of this potentially life-threatening condition is highlighted.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    31 December 2006

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Mark Allen Group

  • Cross Ref:

    10.12968/gasn.2006.4.10.22553

Citation

Smith, G. D., & Mander, R. (2006). The implications of Ogilvie's syndrome for midwives and gastrointestinal nurses. Gastrointestinal nursing, 4(10), 24-31

Authors

Keywords

Intestinal pseudoobstruction, Ogilvie's syndrome, Maternal death, Midwives, Gastrointestinal nurses

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