Katrina Morrison

Katrina Morrison

Dr Katrina Morrison

Lecturer

Biography

I am a lecturer in criminology at Edinburgh Napier, where I have been working part-time since December 2012. I was on secondment to the Scottish Prison Service for two years until autumn 2018. I am also a Board member for Howard League Scotland. Before beginning at Napier I worked with the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (University of Glasgow). I studies for my BA (hons) in sociology and social policy at the University of Edinburgh, and received the James Clerke Memorial prize for best social policy dissertation. I continued onto the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice, where my dissertation examined the history of rehabilitation in Scottish prisons. My PhD examined the effects of devolution on Scottish criminal justice, drawing on theoretical frameworks from social and political sciences and interviews from criminal justice policy-makers and practitioners.

My research interests are Scottish penal policy and penal change, professionalisation, prison officers, reintegration from prison and participatory engagement within prisons. I have secured grants from ESRC , Carnegie Trust and the Scottish Prison Service to explore a range of issues relating to imprisonment and Scottish public policy.

I teach on range of areas within criminology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, both on university campus and within prisons. I supervise students on a range of topics but have an interest in prisons and punishment especially. I established the Howard League Scotland Edinburgh Napier Students group. I lead on the Subject Group's involvement in the Criminology Summer School in which our students have the opportunity to travel to a network of American universities to learn about comparative crime and control. I won the student nominated best lecturer in the School of Applied Sciences in 2019.

Research Areas

Date


18 results

Scotland

Book Chapter
Morrison, K., & Graham, H. (in press)
Scotland. In F. Dünkel, S. Harrendorf, & D. van Zyl Smit (Eds.), The Impact of COVID-19 on Prison Conditions and Penal Policy. London: Routledge
The COVID-19 pandemic has been disruptive and halting in its impact on Scottish justice. This chapter offers a critical analytical overview of how the pandemic has affected Sc...

Becoming a Prison Officer: An Analysis of the Early Development of Prison Officer Cultures

Journal Article
Morrison, K., & Maycock, M. (2021)
Becoming a Prison Officer: An Analysis of the Early Development of Prison Officer Cultures. The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, 60(1), 3-24. https://doi.org/10.1111/hojo.12394
Despite the fact that over recent years, imprisonment in Scotland has adopted a bold and aspirational policy direction including proposed reforms to the role of the prison off...

What are the Implications of Changing Place for the Professional Performativity of Prison Officers?

Journal Article
Maycock, M., McGuckin, K., & Morrison, K. (in press)
What are the Implications of Changing Place for the Professional Performativity of Prison Officers?. Corrections: Policy, Practice and Research, https://doi.org/10.1080/23774657.2020.1821407
Throughcare Support Officers (TSOs) were a unique role in the Scottish criminal justice system when they operated between 2015 and 2019. This research challenges and extends e...

"We are 'free range' prison officers", the experiences of Scottish Prison Service (SPS) Throughcare Support Officers (TSOs) working in custody and the community

Journal Article
Maycock, M., McGuckin, K., & Morrison, K. (2020)
"We are 'free range' prison officers", the experiences of Scottish Prison Service (SPS) Throughcare Support Officers (TSOs) working in custody and the community. Probation Journal, 67(4), 358-374. https://doi.org/10.1177/0264550520954898
Between 2015 and 2019, forty-one Throughcare Support Officers (TSOs) supported people serving short sentences leaving custody across eleven Scottish Prison Service (SPS) estab...

The Paradox Of Scottish Life Imprisonment

Journal Article
Van Zyl Smit, D., & Morrison, K. (2020)
The Paradox Of Scottish Life Imprisonment. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, 28(1), 76-102. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718174-02801004
More people are serving life sentences in Scotland as a proportion of the national population than in any other country in Europe. Yet Scotland claims to adopt a welfarist rat...

Identity, Transitions and Support: Processes of Desistance Among Ex-Military Personnel in Custody

Presentation / Conference
Haddow, C., Winterton, M., & Morrison, K. (2019, June)
Identity, Transitions and Support: Processes of Desistance Among Ex-Military Personnel in Custody. Paper presented at ERGOMAS Biennial Conference, ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal
No abstract available.

Compromise, Partnership, Control: Community Justice Authorities In Scotland

Journal Article
Buchan, J., & Morrison, K. (2020)
Compromise, Partnership, Control: Community Justice Authorities In Scotland. Criminology and Criminal Justice, 20(2), 131-149. https://doi.org/10.1177/1748895818814903
Community Justice Authorities (CJAs) were heralded on their inception as modernising Scotland’s community justice system and resolving longstanding tensions between central an...

Why penal reform should care about prison officers.

Digital Artefact
Morrison, K. (2018)
Why penal reform should care about prison officers
No abstract available.

Professionalism and affective learning for new prison officers: learning values, attitudes and behaviours in training at the Scottish Prison Service

Book Chapter
Morrison, K. (2018)
Professionalism and affective learning for new prison officers: learning values, attitudes and behaviours in training at the Scottish Prison Service. In S. Loo (Ed.), Multiple Dimensions of Teaching and Learning for Occupational Practice. London: Routledge
This paper argues that, as the Scottish Prison Service moves towards professionalisation, the ‘ethical’ component of an officer’s work increases in importance, and that learni...

What does publicly available research submitted to the Scottish Prison Service Research Access and Ethics Committee (2012-2016), tell us about the distinct nature of Imprisonment in Scotland?

Journal Article
Maycock, M., Pratt, D., & Morrison, K. (2018)
What does publicly available research submitted to the Scottish Prison Service Research Access and Ethics Committee (2012-2016), tell us about the distinct nature of Imprisonment in Scotland?. Prison Service Journal, 238, 46-52
The criminal justice system in Scotland is in many ways distinct from criminal justice systems both within the UK and Europe, which is reflected in the institutions, processes...

Current Post Grad projects

Previous Post Grad projects