Stacey Bushfield

stacey bushfield

Dr Stacey Bushfield MA MSc PhD PGCertHE FHEA MCMI

Associate Professor

Biography

Dr Stacey Bushfield is an Associate Professor in Business Research Methods.

Stacey’s current research sits within organisational studies and surrounds health and social care integration, employee engagement, employee voice, work role identities, identity transitions and experiences of hybrid leadership roles. She also has a particular interest in the development and evidencing of research impact and is passionate about developing students’ research skills and building research capacity.

Prior to joining Edinburgh Napier University Business School, Stacey worked for six years as a lecturer at the University of Dundee, has held research posts at the University of Sheffield and the University of Glasgow, and between September 2017 and August 2019, was an Honorary Visiting Fellow at the University of Technology Sydney (Faculty of Health).

Stacey writes for policy, practitioner and academic audiences and her research has been published in Sociology of Health and Illness and Work, Employment and Society. She holds a PhD, MSc and MA from the University of Glasgow. She has received research funding from the Economic and Social Research Council, Scottish Government, Health and Social Care Moray, British Medical Association, and Scottish Enterprise.

She is currently supervising Katie Sinclair, a PhD student at the University of Dundee, on a funded project looking at internal employer branding, talent management, and employee engagement in a multi-national enterprise.

Since joining Edinburgh Napier University, Stacey has been appointed the UG dissertation lead for the Business School, is the fourth year coordinator for the BA (Hons) Business programme and leads the School’s Public and Third Sector research cluster.

Esteem

Research Degree External Examining

  • PhD Examiner

 

Visiting Positions

  • Honorary Visiting Fellow

 

Date


5 results

Changing Logics in Healthcare and Their Effects on the Identity Motives and Identity Work of Doctors

Journal Article
Martin, G., Bushfield, S., Siebert, S., & Howieson, B. (in press)
Changing Logics in Healthcare and Their Effects on the Identity Motives and Identity Work of Doctors. Organization Studies, https://doi.org/10.1177/0170840619895871
Recent literature on hybridity has provided useful insights into how professionals have responded to changing institutional logics. Our focus in on how shifting logics have s...

Eroding ‘Respectability’: Deprofessionalization through organizational spaces

Journal Article
Siebert, S., Bushfield, S., Martin, G., & Howieson, B. (2018)
Eroding ‘Respectability’: Deprofessionalization through organizational spaces. Work, Employment and Society, 32(2), 330-347. https://doi.org/10.1177/0950017017726948
This article addresses the question – can a deterioration in organizational spaces erode a profession’s status? It draws on the organizational spaces literature to analyse the...

How do Elite Doctors Respond to Tensions in Hybrid Healthcare Organizations?

Conference Proceeding
Martin, G., Siebert, S., Howieson, B., & Bushfield, S. (2017)
How do Elite Doctors Respond to Tensions in Hybrid Healthcare Organizations?. https://doi.org/10.5465/ambpp.2017.11574abstract
In this paper we explain how and why elite doctors in public service healthcare respond to increasing hybridity through different forms of identity work, accommodation and res...

The changing experience of work of consultants in NHS Scotland.

Report
Martin, G., Siebert, S., Howieson, B., & Bushfield, S. (2015)
The changing experience of work of consultants in NHS Scotland. British Medical Association
This study was commissioned by the Scottish Consultants’ Committee of the British Medical Association and carried out by independent researchers at the Universities of Dundee ...

Potential challenges facing distributed leadership in health care: evidence from the UK National Health Service

Journal Article
Martin, G., Beech, N., MacIntosh, R., & Bushfield, S. (2015)
Potential challenges facing distributed leadership in health care: evidence from the UK National Health Service. Sociology of Health and Illness, 37(1), 14-29. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.12171
The discourse of leaderism in health care has been a subject of much academic and practical debate. Recently, distributed leadership (DL) has been adopted as a key strand of p...