Research Output

Acceptance of Smartphone-Based Mobile Shopping: Mobile Benefits, Customer Characteristics, Perceived Risks, and the Impact of Application Context

  Despite their generally increasing use, the adoption of mobile shopping applications often differs across purchase contexts. In order to advance our understanding of smartphone‐based mobile shopping acceptance, this study integrates and extends existing approaches from technology acceptance literature by examining two previously underexplored aspects. First, the study examines the impact of different mobile and personal benefits (instant connectivity, contextual value, and hedonic motivation), customer characteristics (habit), and risk facets (financial, performance, and security risk) as antecedents of mobile shopping acceptance. Second, it is assumed that several acceptance drivers differ in relevance subject to the perception of three mobile shopping characteristics (location sensitivity, time criticality, and extent of control), while other drivers are assumed to matter independent of the context. Based on a dataset of 410 smartphone shoppers, empirical results demonstrate that several acceptance predictors are associated with ease of use and usefulness, which in turn affect intentional and behavioral outcomes. Furthermore, the extent to which risks and benefits impact ease of use and usefulness is influenced by the three contextual characteristics. From a managerial perspective, results show which factors to consider in the development of mobile shopping applications and in which different application contexts they matter.

  • Type:

    Article

  • Date:

    09 January 2017

  • Publication Status:

    Published

  • Publisher

    Wiley

  • DOI:

    10.1002/mar.20982

  • ISSN:

    0742-6046

  • Funders:

    Aston University

Citation

Hubert, M., Blut, M., Brock, C., Backhaus, C., & Eberhardt, T. (2017). Acceptance of Smartphone-Based Mobile Shopping: Mobile Benefits, Customer Characteristics, Perceived Risks, and the Impact of Application Context. Psychology and Marketing, 34(2), 175-194. https://doi.org/10.1002/mar.20982

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