Peter Robertson

Peter Robertson

Dr Peter Robertson MSc DipCG CPsychol AFBPsS MCDI FHEA

Associate Professor

Biography

Pete took a degree in psychology at the University of Warwick, and then trained to be a career adviser at Bristol Polytechnic (now UWE). He worked as a career adviser in Hertfordshire and North London, and specialised in supporting young people with disabilities and learning difficulties. After postgraduate training in occupational psychology at the University of East London, he became a training manager in a career guidance company. He moved to Scotland and joined the University in 2001.

Pete is the programme leader for career guidance, and contributes to teaching across a wide range of career counselling and development topics at postgraduate level. He is currently module leader for the Career Development Theory, Policy & Contexts for Practice, and Education & Labour Markets modules.

Pete's research interests focus on several closely related topics:

- evaluating the outcomes of career guidance, and related employment or educational support services
- the links between careers, health and well-being
- the public health implications of careers
- unemployment and mental health
- active labour market programmes for the unemployed
- the transition to adult life for 'NEET' young people
- The 'Capability Approach' of Amartya Sen

Pete is a Chartered Psychologist, a fellow of the National Institute for Career and Educational Counselling (NICEC), a fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA), and a member of the Career Development Institute (CDI) and the International Association for Educational & Vocational Guidance (IAEVG).

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27 results

Trade unions and career services: Potential partners for promoting social justice at work

Journal Article
Robertson, P. J., Cimini, N., Post, J., & Corry, J. (2020)
Trade unions and career services: Potential partners for promoting social justice at work. Journal of the National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 44(1), 5-12. https://doi.org/10.20856/jnicec.4401
This paper argues that trade unions represent natural allies for career services, as they have shared interests in addressing issues of social justice at work. This potentiall...

Making sense of career theory

Journal Article
Robertson, P. (2019)
Making sense of career theory. Career Matters, 7(4), 36-37
Pete Robertson offers a quick guide to reading the career theory literature for students and practitioners.

The impact of career guidance on the mental well-being of young people.

Report
Robertson, P. (2019)
The impact of career guidance on the mental well-being of young people. Career Development Institute
Mental health conditions have relatively early onset compared to other major disease categories, and therefore have the potential to cause distress and negative economic impac...

A role for trades unions in careers education

Other
Cimini, N., & Robertson, P. (2019)
A role for trades unions in careers education
No abstract available.

Building capabilities in disabled job seekers: A qualitative study of the Remploy Work Choices programme in Scotland

Journal Article
Robertson, P. J. (2018)
Building capabilities in disabled job seekers: A qualitative study of the Remploy Work Choices programme in Scotland. Social Work and Society: International Online Journal, 16(1), 1-15
This article reports on a qualitative study of the UK’s labour activation pathway for jobseekers with disabilities and health conditions. The aim was to explore the experienc...

A capability approach to career development: An introduction and implications for practice

Journal Article
Robertson, P. J., & Egdell, V. (2018)
A capability approach to career development: An introduction and implications for practice. Australian Journal of Career Development, 27(3), 119-126. https://doi.org/10.1177/1038416217704449
In the UK, the concept of employability is influential in current conceptualizations of career development. It is an example of a discourse underpinned by faith in individual ...

Job search information behaviours: An ego-net study of networking amongst young job-seekers

Journal Article
Mowbray, J., Hall, H., Raeside, R., & Robertson, P. J. (2018)
Job search information behaviours: An ego-net study of networking amongst young job-seekers. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 50(3), (239-253). ISSN 0961-0006
Networking is considered an integral feature of job search, yet its behavioural manifestation has received little attention in the extant literature. Here this is addressed in...

The casualties of transition: the health impact of NEET status and some approaches to managing it

Journal Article
Robertson, P. J. (2018)
The casualties of transition: the health impact of NEET status and some approaches to managing it. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 47(3), 390-402. https://doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2018.1455168
Youth unemployment can be understood as a major public health risk. This paper explores the multidisciplinary literature in this field, and its relevance to support for NEET (...

Developing career capabilities in “NEET” young people: experiences of participants in the Prince’s Trust team programme

Journal Article
Robertson, P. J. (2018)
Developing career capabilities in “NEET” young people: experiences of participants in the Prince’s Trust team programme. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 46(6), 752-764. https://doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2018.1434130
This qualitative study focuses on the impact of a supportive 12-week programme intended to empower young people who are not in employment, education or training (NEET) to purs...

Bhaskar and Sen: Two foundations on which to build a new approach to career guidance and life planning

Journal Article
Robertson, P. J. (2018)
Bhaskar and Sen: Two foundations on which to build a new approach to career guidance and life planning. Indian Journal of Career and Livelihood Planning, 6(1), 22-28
This paper argues for a new perspective on guidance and life planning that is informed, but not dominated, by pre-existing Western conceptions of career. Two scholars are high...

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